Paul Auster, Hand to Mouth: a Chronicle of Early Failure

1107529I wanted a book for an hour and a half journey, something short that could prevent me from thinking over that creeping groans of planes that all of you perfectly know. I entered the bookshop with the familiar sense of Connection with the Universe that goes together with the act of Buying a Book, but I had finished Brooklyn Follies a few hours before so I was in the middle of a Paul Auster Withdrawal Syndrome. I thus pointed to his shelf like a diviner and caressed the covers until I sensed a bookish vibration. I chose a tiny, thin book. The back cover said: In my late twenties and early thirties, I went through a period of several years when everything I touched turned to failure. At that point the Message from the Universe was quite clear, but it was the following line that convinced me that it would be my plane-book: Paul Auster speaks of his initial failure and his struggle to write and earn a living. Continue reading

Kafka’s Doll

Modificate in Lumia Selfie

While I was reading Paul Auster’s The Brooklyn Follies I stumbled upon this passage, which deeply moved me. It is a sort of cammeo, a metaliterary digression that interrupts the plot in order to blink at the reader. You will find much material about this passage and this (at first glance) light novel by Paul Auster. Here, the author clearly reflects on the double-edged power of literature and imaginary worlds.

Down here for you, the wonderful excerpt about Kafka’s doll…

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Currently reading V – A novel, an essay, a poet

I ‘m coming back to literature. I spent nine months in a submerged study of biochemistry and molecular medicine in order to understand my illness and cope with it, but Spring is taking me back to reading and life. I am already writing my reviews, but I would  like to introduce you right now to three great authors I am reading in this period:

  1. Paul Auster, The Brooklyn Follies
  2. Nicholas Ashford/Claudia Miller, Chemical Exposures – Low Levels and High Stakes
  3. Abtellatif Laabi, Poems and prison writing